Dermot O'Leary and Alison Hammond on This Morning on Monday
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The 39 swear words banned from daytime TV as Dermot O’Leary breaks rule on This Morning

ITV surely won't be happy with Dermot

Dermot O’Leary stunned This Morning viewers when he accidentally swore at Alison Hammond on Monday.

The ITV star shocked fans watching at home when he labelled his co-star a “b*tch”.

The comment came as the pair laughed their way through a segment about their TV appearances back in the day.

“You looked hot back in the day, you should so go back to a bald head,” said Alison. “Why don’t you shave your head off? Look at how fit you look! You were so good on that show.”

“Just that show?” he asked her.

“Yeah, just that one. Only joking,” she replied.

Dermot then muttered: “Such a [bleep].”

As a result, ITV could find itself in hot water with Ofcom.

The TV watchdog recommends certain swear words are only to be uttered on TV after the 9pm watershed.

Dermot O'Leary and Alison Hammond on This Morning on Monday
Dermot O’Leary swore at Alison Hammond as the pair joked on This Morning (Credit: ITV)

Dermot O’Leary swears on This Morning: What words are banned?

Here’s a look at Ofcom’s latest list and how it classifies them and their use.

Be warned, there are some rather cheeky words to follow!

Ar*e: Mild language, generally of little concern.

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Ar*ehole: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. More aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact.

B*lls: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Particularly vulgar or sexual use heightens the impact, especially for women.

B*stard: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. More aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact. Less problematic when used to refer indirectly to someone who is cruel or nasty.

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B*llend: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen by some as a childish word often said in jest. More aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact.

Bint: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as potentially derogatory by women, but men also find the word problematic.

B*tch: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. More aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact.

Bloody: Mild language, generally of little concern. Frequently used in everyday language to express emotion, and not usually as a directed insult.

B*llocks: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Not generally offensive but somewhat vulgar when used to refer to testicles. Less problematic when used to mean ‘nonsense’.

B*gger: Mild language, generally of little concern. Frequently used in everyday language to express emotion when making a mistake. Seen as much stronger when used in a clearly sexual context.

Bullsh*t: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Older participants are more likely to consider the word unacceptable.

Dermot O'Leary and Alison Hammond on This Morning on Monday
Viewers were stunned to hear Dermot swear on This Morning (Credit: ITV)

More words frowned upon by Ofcom

C*ck: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as vulgar and distasteful by many. Less problematic when used in a humorous context.

Cow: Mild language, generally of little concern. Commonly viewed as a humorous insult.

Crap: Mild language, generally of little concern.

C**t: Strongest language, problematic for some even post-watershed. Vulgar, derogatory and shocking for both men and women. Especially distasteful and offensive to women and older participants.

Damn: Mild language, generally of little concern.

D*ck: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as vulgar and distasteful by many. Less problematic when used in a humorous context, and generally considered slightly milder than ‘cock’.

D*ckhead: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as vulgar and distasteful by many. Less problematic when used in a humorous context.

F*nny: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as crude, particularly by women.

Feck/Effing: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Often seen as humorous. Older participants are more likely to consider the word unacceptable.

Ofcom regularly updates its list (This Morning’s Dermot should have a quick refresher!)

F*ck: Strongest language, unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as strong, aggressive and vulgar. Older participants are more likely to consider the word unacceptable.

Ginger: Mild language, generally of little concern. Typically viewed as a humorous insult, however, more aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact.

Git: Mild language, generally of little concern. Typically viewed as a humorous insult.

God: Mild language, generally of little concern when used to express emotion. A concern for older or more religiously sensitive participants when used as an obscenity. Some recognition that this may offend religious people.

Goddam: Mild language, generally of little concern when used to express emotion. Seen as slightly stronger than ‘God’ because it is more aggressive. Some recognition that this might offend religious people.

Jesus Christ: Mild language, generally of little concern when used to express emotion. A concern for older or more religiously sensitive participants when used as an obscenity. Some recognition that this may offend religious people.

Kn*b: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as vulgar and distasteful by many. Less problematic when used in a humorous context, and is generally considered slightly milder than ‘c*ck’.

Minger: Mild language, generally of little concern. Viewed as a humorous insult. More unpleasant than offensive. More aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact.

Motherf*cker: Strongest language, problematic for some even post-watershed. Vulgar, derogatory and shocking for both men and women. Seen as very aggressive when intended to hurt or offend.

Ofcom also has lists of offensive gestures

Munter: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. More aggression or specific intent to hurt heightens impact.

P*ssed/p*ssed off: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Neither meaning – drunk or angry – particularly offensive but more problematic when used aggressively or repeatedly.

Pr*ck: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Less problematic when used in a humorous context.

P*nani: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Not always recognised. Seen as vulgar and distasteful by those familiar.

P*ssy: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as vulgar and distasteful when used to refer to the vagina. Much milder when used to mean weak or ineffectual but still seen as problematic by some.

Sh*t: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Common language used in everyday life but problematic when used aggressively or repeatedly. Concerns about children learning the word.

Sod off: Mild language, generally of little concern.

Son of a b*tch: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed.

T*ts: Medium language, potentially unacceptable pre-watershed. Vulgar or sexual use heightens the impact.

Tw*t: Strong language, generally unacceptable pre-watershed. Seen as vulgar and distasteful when used to refer to the vagina. Less problematic if describing a rude or obnoxious person, but still potentially offensive.

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