Ted Hastings has a new catchphrase in Line Of Duty
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Line Of Duty: Ted Hastings fans love ‘houl yer wheesht’ catchphrase but what does it mean?

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Line Of Duty fans are loving Superintendent Ted Hastings’ new catchphrase, “houl yer wheesht”.

The hit BBC crime drama returned last night (Sunday March 21) for its new, sixth series.

Subsequently, fans were on Ted Hastings watch, eager to see which new Northern Irish catchphrase he came out with.

And they weren’t disappointed.

Ted Hastings has a new catchphrase in Line Of Duty
Viewers loved the new catchphrase (Credit: BBC)

What was the new catchphrase in Line Of Duty?

DI Steve Arnott went to his boss after receiving a call from Sergeant Farida Jatri who accused her boss, DCI Joanne Davidson of being a bent copper.

Steve presented the evidence to Ted, and showed him the members of Davidson’s team.

They included DI Kate Fleming.

Read more: Line Of Duty: Fans convinced they’ve worked out H after The Caddy clue

After seeing Kate’s photograph in the file, Ted seemed to change his mind about the investigation.

And, when Steve persisted and pleaded for Ted to open an inquiry, the Superintendent cut him short.

“Houl yer wheesht, I need more [evidence],” he barked.

How did viewers react?

Viewers took to Twitter to share their delight.

One fan wrote: “Watching #LineOfDuty and in a matter of a few minutes Adrian Dunbar said both ‘banjaxed’ and ‘houl yer whisht’ and I’m a happy wee Fermanagh girl right now.”

Twenty minutes in and Ted has already told Steve Arnott to houl his wish.

Another said: “Twenty minutes in and Ted has already told Steve Arnott to houl his wish.

“Line Of Duty does not disappoint. #LineOfDuty”

A third asked in amazement: “Did Hastings just say ‘Haud your wheesht’ #LineOfDuty”.

Ted Hastings has a new catchphrase in Line Of Duty
The BBC subtitles spelt the phrase for viewers (Credit: BBC)

What does the phrase mean?

Despite viewers’ delight at the new catchphrase, there was confusion about its correct spelling and its origin.

On the subtitles supplied by the BBC, the phrase was spelt ‘Houl yer whisht’.

Read more: What is a CHIS and what does DIR mean? Line of Duty series 6 acronyms and police jargon explained!

After more investigation, the phrase ‘haud yer wheesht’ is Scottish in origin.

The phrase was first used in the 14th century and can be used as a verb, a noun, and an interjection.

But it seems it has a different spelling in Northern Ireland, and the phrase has different spelling depending on who you talk to.

However, the Ulster-Scots Agency told ED! that the nearest to correct spelling is ‘houl yer wheesht’.

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