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Thursday 17th January 2019

ABC Murders writer jokes she'll adapt "Pride & Prejudice in a crack den" in hilarious jab at trolls

Sarah Phelps hit back at critics on Twitter

The ABC Murders writer Sarah Phelps has hit back at critics who accused her of ruining the BBC1 adaptation of Agatha Christie's famous Poirot novel.

Sarah joked that she will "rewrite Pride and Prejudice in a crack den" as she went on the offensive on Twitter after being deluged with messages attacking her TV drama.

Hitting back, she posted: "And thanks to all of you, those who enjoyed it and those who didn't. See you next time when I rewrite Pride and Prejudice in a crack den.

"You're all lovely. A bientot, mes enfants. (See you soon, my children.) #TheABCMurders"

The BBC's three-part version, which began on Boxing Day and concluded last night, left many viewers furious for not staying faithful to the books.

So there was a murder and the victim was Agatha Christie's book.

John Malkovich stars as an older Hercule Poirot investigating a serial killer who is taking out victims in alphabetical order.

Sarah Phelps at The ABC Murders screening (Credit: SplashNews)

Read more: Viewers furious at BBC for completely changing Poirot's backstory

The cast includes Rupert Grint, best known for playing Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter movies.

Malkovich's Belgian accent came under scrutiny, with some viewers saying it sounded more like the English policeman  Crabtree in sitcom 'Allo 'Allo!

Others were upset that there was no appearance by Poirot's trusty sidekick Hastings.

John Malkovich plays Hercule Poirot (Credit: BBC/Mammoth Screen/Agatha Christie Ltd)

One fan tweeted: "Whoever scripted, produced and directed this tosh should not get a pay cheque. Slow, dull, tedious, dark, indeed boring; loud sound effects and whispered dialogue. Won't watch the next two episodes."

Another wrote: "So there was a murder and the victim was Agatha Christie's book."

Last night's final episode left other fans irate that the writer had changed Poirot's backstory by making him a priest.

Rupert Grint as Inspector Crome (Credit: BBC/Mammoth Screen/Agatha Christie Ltd)

Read more: Viewers outraged as BBC CHANGES killer in Ordeal by Innocence

One viewer posted: "Bloody hell. Poirot was never a priest. It's one thing to adapt a story, and another to completely balls it up. #ABCMurders"

A second added: "It's a nice creative touch, but I just don't think everyone *needs* a Nolan-Batman-level backstory #ABCMurders"

What did you make of the BBC's adaptation? Leave us a comment on our Facebook page @EntertainmentDailyFix and let us know what you think!