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Saturday 6th June 2020

BBC Presenter admits that chemotherapy has failed

He also reveals the emotional moment that he told his family about the cancer diagnosis

BBC's The Media Show presenter Steve Hewlett, has admitted that the first course of chemotherapy he has received has failed.

The Radio 4 stalwart discovered in March that he has cancer of the oesophagus, which connects the throat to the stomach.

He revealed to listeners his diagnosis during an emotional interview on Radio 4's PM programme, three weeks ago.

Steve is now going to have a second course of chemotherapy, plus radiotherapy, at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London.

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He says that he's remaining "relatively positive" but has revealed the toughest part of being diagnosed with cancer was the moment it showed him how much he meant to his family.

Steve said he never “imagined seriously” that he would get cancer after routine blood tests came back with worrying results.

But he later discovered he had a stage 4, advanced adenocarcinoma.

Speaking to the Radio Times, he said: “Once it became clear that because the cancer had already spread there was no ‘curative’ surgical option, the prognosis was somewhere between not very good and totally uncertain.

“And it was when telling my children and other close loved ones that I realised something that has really stuck with me.

"I knew what they all meant to me but not what I meant to them.

“The looks in their eyes as they contemplated my mortality will stay with me forever.”

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But he said being open with his family was crucial, adding: “I’m absolutely convinced that the more we talk about cancer, the better it is for all concerned.

“In the end I’m sure telling them everything – good and bad – is right."

Steve also revealed that he was happy to talk about his fight against cancer, in the hope that it helps others.

He said: "Not enough is said, often enough, about cancer".